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and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel. richard, fill us in a little more this morning. >> reporter: good morning. a libyan source has told nbc news that the u.s. ambassador who was visiting the consulate was killed along with three others. not sure of the nationality of those three others. the u.s. state department has not confirmed this, but this has been told to us by a senior security source in libya. we've been also told that the libyan prime minister and the libyan president will both be speaking today about this subject, offering their condolences to the united states and to the family of the fallen ambassador. and this is according to the report. we were told that when gunmen and a mob stormed the consulate building, they first attacked it with rpgs, then the
way? what constitutes the wrong way? here in united states and in the middle east there is enormous debate over how to handle iran's pursuit of a nuclear enrichment capability, a capability which would give iran the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons if they chose to do so. and obvious a this is an issue that's been with us for a very long time. i remember i first encountered it in immediate aftermath of the gulf war in 1991 when israel purchased 25 longer-range f-15 e. strike fighters. and those fighters were designated not f-15 e., but f-15-i. and the manufacture said that the i was for israel. if you spoke to israeli air force pilots and commanders, what the uniform would say to you is now now now that i is for iraq. this is an issue, this is a problem, it is a threat that the israelis have been thinking about for a very long time. they has been a great deal of effort trying to figure out how to develop a military option to disarm iran, to destroy its nuclear program if they ever chose to do so. and they've been working very deciduous lead at the. but by the same token, you w
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
in the british foreign office in the united states should have the capacity to keep our eye on more than one war upon. >> i suppose the key was to negotiate. it didn't work that way. if it didn't work that way in a western democracy, the do very little chance of the work in that way in afghanistan, therefore the extent to which there is an engagement, whether it's track to her otherwise with the taliban if they think they're important because you can wait a long, long time for the kind of progress in security level, which may never happen. >> you're absolutely right. i keep using that as an example. there was no military plan that has that is the subject to defeating the insurgency. our strategy is not defeating the insurgency. >> affair in which he said among the afghan leadership. >> i think they generally want assessment. they have huge differences on what terms are prepared to accept. if you talk to afghan women, they are very worthy attempts of settlement will be to their detriment. you also talk and they don't want to give up the amount of power they've had. they've had more power than the
the united states. ever. it is likely the iranian's president final speech to the u.n. attacking the united states and railed on israel calling its people "uncivilized." this is the holiest jewish holiday of the year. both presidential nominees crossing paths in ohio today. voters in ohio cast ballots in days. we will look at the poll that shows a candidate leading well outside the margin of error. the rising cost to stay in touch. smartphones can be expensive. we know that. just wait until you hear how much they are cutting into a lot of family budgets. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, the iranian president, ahmadinejad, today delivered what could be the last antiisraeli american and antiisraeli ranting in front of the u.n. the american delegation did not walk out. the american delegation never even showed up. they were out before he took the podium. the president, ahmadinejad, has less than a year left in the second and final term. the united states and israel have accuseddive ran of working toward a nu
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
that open new plants and train new workers right here in the united states of america we can reward those companies that build right here and double their exports. we can create 1 million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years. you can make that happen. >> i want to create a future where everyone who wants a job can find a job. where no senior figures for their security of their retirement and every parent knows that their child will get an education that leads to a good job and a bright horizon. and unlike the president, i have a plan to create 12 million new jobs. host: has either campaign in specific on how they plan to create 1 million new jobs? politics is not my area, but from what i have followed i have not seen at all specifically this is going to happen. its romney's plan, one of five. is to reduce the deficit. but it is not clear how it leads to more jobs in a direct way. obviously, overall, a strong quake -- stronger economy and reduced debt leads to a better economic environment. but as you cut contractors, teachers, whatever -- anytime government is cutting spending, c
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
was that, as the group here in the united states -- the united way is allowed to deduct from paychecks, yes? in order to have their funding, we wanted to have the same kind of thing possible for this international overseas giving program, which encompassed about 10 very worthy groups. we were actually beaten down on that by the united way who did not want anyone else to have such president, such a privilege, even though the funds -- such a precedent, such a privilege, even though the funds would not be competitive. it would not be going to anybody else in the country but overseas. isen's health care considered in many places a luxury and certainly far down on the list of the imperatives for that nation's funding. >> what should we take away from the virginia state legislators attend to require ultrasound for any women seeking abortions. [laughter] >> you know, it is a good thing my daughter is here. i woke up this morning -- somebody had brought this up yesterday and i was so bloody angry i said, you know what i am tempted to say and she said, don't say that, mom. so i will follow my daught
is suspending joint missions between the united states soldier and afghan soldiers with a growing number of insider attacks. what does this mean for the end of the war? or the war now? we have details from the pentagon. and the attack on diplomatic missions across the middle east putting foreign policy on the campaign trail controversial. the potential impact on the undecided voters coming up. a study suggests letting your kid take the occasional sip of alcohol may really not be the best way to stop your child from becoming a heavy drinker later on. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." but, first, from fox at 3:00 in new york city, the race if the white house. the republican presidential nominee, mitt romney, is responding today to a video shot in may during a private fundraiser. an attendee secretly recorded and it gave it to the liberal website "mother jones." in the video, he touches on everything from foreign policy to the economy. at one point he calls president obama supporters "people who are dependent upon the government who believe they
and final term. the united states and israel have accuseddive ran of working toward a nuclear bomb. inspectors have questioned claims that the enrichment activists are for peaceful purposes. ahmadinejad said the israelis were uncivilized zionists. >> the pledge to disclose armaments in due time is being used as a threat against nations to get them to accept a new era of continued threats while the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear average of this reality. >>shepard: as i reported the american delegation boycotted the speech along with the israeli delegates which decided not to hear the iranian president on john yom kippur, te most holy day of the jewish calendar. >> he again used the trip to the united nations not to address the legitimate aspirations of the iranian people, but, instead, spout paranoid theories and repulsive slurs against israelis according to the mission to the u.n., the special spokesman. more subdued this year than last year. >>jonathan: given this is his last speech as president of iran and the rhetoric we hav
in our laws. our constitution protects the right to practice free speech. here in the united states, countless publications provoke offense. like me, the majority of americans are christian and yet we do not plan blasphemy against our most sacred beliefs. >> watched that and was ripping my hair out. do we really think that was about the movie. here he is legitimatizing that point of view saying all this had to do with the movie. first of all do you believe that the attacks on the ambassador were -- >> president obama were a law professor he would describe that as a red herring that is totally irrelevant concern that takes the obama administration kind of off the hook for how they missed the ba on this. this was a planned attack. melissa: right. >> he had u.n. ambassador on a week and a half ago saying this was spontaneous attack that is ridiculous statement. these were grenades that were propelled in a massive way. these were massive arms. people don't bring these things to, to spontaneous demonstrations. now all this evidence is coming out that the ambassador himself had, had a dia
of the united states being torn down from embassies across the middle east and replaced over sovereign u.s. territory with the flag of al qaeda. you have tens of thousands of people being killed in syria and the administration is doing 234 nothing about it. looks like tehran, 1979, across the middle east. >> that's what many republicans are saying. the democrats and some republicans say governor romney stumbled badly when he criticized mr. obama after the death of the u.s. ambassador to libya. in the end, could you argue that romney's tactic proves successful? it did change the conversation. at least about libya. >> yeah. find it -- fascinating that so many people are talking about romney had a gaffe. it turns out he was right. that one that it was wrong to put pout an n a statement -- criticizing the -- apologizing for the video which the administration continued to do and obama will do again today in his u.n. speech. but also, you know, who had the foreign policy gaffes? it has been president obama. president obama went on "60 minutes" and called what's happening in the middle east bum
'm not trying to say new york is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we're all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time, new york is the great magnet for immigrants, from around the world from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward has been a place where discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political culture, their own loyalties and allegiances come in their ethnic and national religious cultures and have ended up jostling each other often. and especially at times of war, this has been the case in new york. sometimes with tragic consequences. so i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting today. so this is april of 1861, after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in this world war began. this is one of the mass rall
've always expected people would get in the united states of america. that only comes from the private sector. that's where, i think, the romney approach, people will find to be the right one. >> this market has been rallying. of course, it seems to be working in obama's favor, even though it's probably has a lot more to do with the central bank and all of the easing out there than it does to the policies. is there any reason to believe that if this president is re-elected, then he moves to the center that, he does the policies that you're talking about that romney, of course, has been leading with? >> i think that's been my greatest disappointment, that we have not seen this government move more to a centerous approach to move the country forward. there were numerous opportunities to do that. i just don't think it aligns with where the president would like to take the country. there's one approach that says static pie, let's figure out how to split it up. that's the approach that's being taken. when they say we're all in this together, we're all in this together, but we're going to take from
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
in the united states. some indexes they watch on a weekly basis have been lower recently and that will fuel a lot of talk about a bit of a slowdown. front-running the fed, guys, did you see what happened yesterday? i pointed out some of the biggest etfs in the high yield area. i'm talking about j&k had heavy volume and hitting new highs. why is that happening? a lot of people believe at the minimum the fed is going to extend forward guidance to keep interest rates low to at least 2015. all of that would be a big beneficiary to high-yield funds who are forcing people to go out on the yield curve. this is one simple way people are already anticipating exactly what the fmoc is going to be doing. back to you. >> terrific, bob. got to ask rick. looks like people sell bond, shift bonds to the dollar. rick is at cm group in chicago. >> thank you. i guess we should welcome europe to the same club the u.s. is in. lots of liquidity. maybe more liquidity coming. and a generally weak economy. welcome to the club. if you look at our charts, they pretty much reflect a lot of what central banking is doing
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
. it was happening. in the last election, 2008 the jewish vote in the united states when 78 percent president obama. >> if you ask me about the policy of president obama regarding is relevant to you president obama was not a friend of israel. stuart: that is where i have to hand it. dagen and, carry it forward. charles: you'll be interested, we have a big story that just came in. sports related. dagen: everyone listen to this breaking news. you will want to hear it. the owners of the boston red sox have begun quietly shopping the team and are mulling a potential sale of the story baseball franchise. charles: well, charlie gasparino is the one breaking business. he joins us on the telephone with some details. >> reporter: well, full disclosure, this is coming from a yankee fan. [laughter] taken for what it's worth. people with direct knowledge of the situation, here's what we know. the boston red sox management is quietly shopping the franchise. they have had an internal discussion about selling the boston red sox. they have talked to at least one person i know about the potential sale of the price
around van heusen in particular and arrow, the two larges brands in the united states. then our sportswear izod, a major roll-out with jc penney with the brand there. continued strong growth in our department store base, particularly macy's. that brand continues to perform and regain positioning. >> jc penney is a battleground. people worried that perhaps they are not doing well on your conference call you made it clear stores within stores are fantastic for your future. >> you know, we think it is a great way to show case our brands. we have seen early results and i'm talking about very early. ten days worth of sales so far as new shops have gone in. we have seen good sales performance in those stores. ron johnson from jc penney has talked about the transformation he's taking the company through. clearly he's been up front about the rocky issues he's had to keel wi deal with. they have a clear path. we are being as supportive as we can with them, not only with izod but with van heusen. we are a big part of the dress furnishings business to move the consumer forward. >> do they
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
, bond purchases every month meant to give banks the ability to lend more to people in the united states. italy and spain, two big countries considered too big to fail in the ongoing eurozone crisis could get bailout funds going forward to bring down their borrowing costs. both are instances of central banks initiating action when the political will to act is lacking, whether in washington or in europe's capital. joining me now to debate the tactics is rich quest. richard, welcome. today's q and a question is are central banks saving the world or are they making things worse? i'll go first, richard. give me 60 seconds on the clock starting now. richard, central banks are doing the right thing by taking action to shore up our troubled economies, but it is only half the equation. there is a world financial crisis like the one we witnessed four years ago when lehman brothers collapse two things need to be done. number one, central banks need to step in with emergency fiscal moves. two, make smart political decisions and that is what's lacking in the united states and in europe's capitals. a
mortgages and potentially other assets until we see unemployment improve in the united states, is that a good decision on his part? >> it's not my habit to comment on decisions of the sister institutions. i would only say that it demonstrates, also, that when you look at the advanced economy through the grade of the central banking, you see that we are all engaged in nonstandard measures. >> how worried are you about the fiscal cliff in the united states is this. >> i think it is part of course of the major issue that in the advanced world you have to cope with. >> but if it happens, does it bring on another recession in the united states? >> i'm sure that the u.s. leadership, whatever you have in the president discussion of course between the two major sensitivities, but a sense of the saw peer kror interests of the country will prevail. i'm absolutely confident in that. i don't trust that it is possible that the sense of the superior interests of the united states of america and by way of consequence of the entire of course advanced economy and by way of consequence the enti
, or is this something much deeper, a long simmering distrust of the united states? >> it's all the above. it's much long-simmering resentment of the united states. it has some legitimate reasons, but it's essentially a pretext, and it is not really about religion. it's about politics and world power. it's about what's taking place in these countries that are going through a tremendous complex, painful transition. take egypt, for instance, extremists and islamists with different interpretations of islam competing with the mainstream islamist group in egypt which is the muslim brotherhood. >> right. >> they whipped up frenzy against the movie initially, and then the president, who is very cynical, was looking to protect his flanks so he called for more monstrations instead of containing the demonstrations or condemning them so what you have is a competition in egypt as to who is going to shape the future of egypt, and using this movie as a pretext. >> which raised the question. is this about the united states really a all, or is this about uncertainty in these people's own futures and their religious lead
've been talking this week about red lines that he doesn't want iran to cross before the united states would be involved in military action. i think he's going to lay out what his red lines are and to say to the world, listen, this is a crisis that the whole world has to deal with. i think this is seen as his final warning that if we done see movement on this issue, israel will have to act. >> i want to talk about the iranian president. i'll let you first eat a little crow. you made a prediction that was wrong. >> i thought -- i said yesterday on this show that i thought ahmadinejad would kind of go for broke, kamikaze in his last u.n. general assembly. instead, he talked about, you know, this new world order that he sees when the world powers would have less influence. but he wasn't as fiery. he didn't mention israel by name. i think a lot of people were surprised. in the statements he was saying leading up to this appearance he was much more fiery. i think in addition to ban ki-moon, the u.n. secretary general asking him to tone it down, i think maybe the supreme leader in iran said
. the defense minister pointed out we have best relations between israel and united states of the securities we have ever had. we have operation iron dome which allows the folks in israel to be protected from these rockets. i think it is one of those things that it is election year thing. connell: but the week of the u.n. general assembly, you don't think that's a fair political criticism from the other side? say hey listen, there's a lot going on here in the world, you should have sat down with them, you don't think that's fair? >> i don't think it's fair. he keeps good communications with the rest of the world. our relations with the rest of the world have been better than a long time. when i travel, people were very very pleased with what the administration was doing. they respect the president. look, we're in the last what 40 some days of a presidential campaign. that's the high priority. connell: let's talk about that a little bit before we let you go. the republicans would say look at the unemployment rate under president obama how it's stayed above 8%, this is quote unquote our year, we
as assistant secretary of the navy and went on to become vice president and president of the united states. in 1916, roosevelt the secretary of the navy. he has been appointed to the record as the associate justice by president william howard taft. but he resigned in 1916 to become the republican candidate for president and he ran against woodrow wilson and a dreadful campaign he was the odds favor, but ultimately lost california by 4000 votes and therefore the election. he went to bed the night of the election thinking he had one. franklin roosevelt was said that wilson supporter went to bed thinking he's had one also. and the next morning the returns from the midwest and particularly california came in and it turned out that wilson one the election just rarely. roosevelt continued as assistant secretary of the navy and then he has to act to private practice in new york city. roosevelt in 1920 became the vice residential candidate of the democratic party, running with governor james cox of ohio. they got trapped by calvin coolidge and warren harding, coolidge's republican party. and at th
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
of the united states. i've got a very effective campaign doing a very good job, but not everything i say is elegant and i want to make it very clear, i want to help 100% of the people. >> dave: he followed up by saying, you know, you didn't totally answer that question, but to romney's point. do you need a complete change of direction or turn around or campaign better and minimize mistake. comes down to debate. october 3rd the big first debate. >> and like that he addressed the 47%, hey, i wasn't an elegant speaker and i do want to help all americans. >> clayton: now more on that, and could it come down to foreign policy? we'll ask chris wallace about that coming up in a little bit. the number of able bodied americans on food stamps has doubled as president obama changed to welfare reform law. how can it be a fair and balanced debate. >> not so sweet 16. thousands of teenagers showing up and reuting in the streets. ahead. ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to free my soul ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to lose control ♪ ♪ where's the party (car horn) paying with your smartphone ins
the state of the economy than any other government reports we're getting. ashley: united states is one of the world's most economically free countries. think again. the cato institute says the u.s. dropped from the top 10 to 18th on the list in its annual report. coauthor ian vasquez will be our special guest ahead to explain that. 18th in economic --. tracy: we were 10th last year. he has got to tell us what is going on. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. we head down to nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole we're down about eight points right now? >> right. the truth is yesterday we gave back about 40 points. wee had two weeks in a row about gains. fed stimulus and bond buying extending low rates. everyone seems to be taking a bit of a breather. right now the dow is down as are s&p and nasdaq as well, all to the downside. down .1 or .2 of a percent. we have winners like apple which obviously broke new records. fedex has come under pressure. fedex once again is warning about a tough global economy. so they came out with their numbers today. they
been going in terms of violence, and also, he says this is not over yet because if the united states does not respond appropriately to his mind, which means punishing those involved with this film, he says these protests could continue. i said, what do you want to have dope to the filmmakers? he said, well, i'd like to see them tried in front of a sharia court meaning if they don't repent for insulting the prophet, he thinks they should be executed. that shows how quickly, simply how a jihadist leader talks about an anti-american protest brings out a few thousand people in front of the u.s. embassy. that shows the ground swell of anti-americanism now taking place in cairo. back to you. tracy: leeland, out in cay row, thank you very much. ashley: continuing with rising tensions in the middle east, oil traders growing more concerned as conflicts spread west to oil rich nigeria. phil flynn has more on this. are you concerned then, phil, what's going on in nigeria? >> i am right now. see, egypt doesn't produce a lot of oil, and because we built in good buffer of supply in case of a disru
, ceo and cofounder. we always love when people come back to the united states. so far you have just begun the process. talk about you do and why you chose china as a place to do it. you do led lighting. how long were you in china and why did you choose to go there originally? >> well, first of all, thanks for having me, dave, liz. we chose to go to china, we first opened in 2007 in china. we did a lot of engineering stuff over there because the costs were obviously a lot cheaper. and really what we concentrated on in 2000 was expanding there quite a bit. since, since 2009 we've really, we've really looked at our costs and even though it is a lot cheaper for to us manufacture products in china we've done the proper social thing about bringing businesses back to the u.s.. david: so tell us, first of all exactly how much of a loss, i mean, essentially you are going to be paying more by higher labor costs, will you not, coming into the united states? >> yeah, we're paying more but you know, there is field expenses too have that gone up which makes china knot appealing to us and also the
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
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